Black History for KIDS

Celebrate

Black History Month presents a great opportunity, not only to celebrate the achievements of African-Americans who have helped shape our culture, but also time to reflect on where we are as a nation.  We need to continue to grow together.  Above all, it is a time to rise-up to remember that the only race that defines us is the human race.

In the Classroom

Teaching Black History to children helps build a connection with history, so they can better understand the past, and develop compassion for other people.   Furthermore, engaging children in activities such as reading books, listening to music, making meals, or watching video footage of actual events are great ways to teach kids about the African-American experience. These are activities that can be explored all year, not just in February. Almost every new teacher asks for ideas on how to teach Black History in the classroom, so here are some ideas to consider.

  • Food to try.
    • Stoplight Cookies with M&Ms (discuss the inventor of the stoplight, Garrett Morgan)
    • Twice-Baked Yams
    • Okra
    • Banana Pudding
    • Sweet Tea
    • Shrimp Creole
    • Peanut Soup (discuss George Washington Carver) *Make sure you check for any food allergies before serving.
  • Listen to music.
  • Watch a video. (Make sure it is culturally sensitive by maintaining a strict level of sensitivity to language.)
  • Make a craft.
  • Seek out guest speakers.
    • I like to find a parent or a teacher who can talk about their choice of an African-American who made an impact in our cultural. They can read a book or do a speech. This should be approved by an administrator.
  • Write about your favorite African American Hero.

Finally, here is a list of African-Americans who are influential for students to write about:
•Oprah
•Elijah McCoy
•Harriet Tubman
•Frederick Douglass
•George Washington Carver
•Booker T. Washington
•Samuel Morris
•Dred Scott
•Matthew Henson
•Garrett A. Morgan
•James Weldon Johnson
•Colin Powell
•Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
•Barack Obama
•Mary Mcleod Bethune
•Ruby Bridges
•Mahalia Jackson
•Marian Anderson: singer
•Maya Angelou: singer, actress, activist, writer, poet
•Lil Hardin Armstrong: jazz musician
•Pearl Bailey: singer, performer, stage, film, special ambassador
•Marian Anderson: singer
•Regina Anderson: librarian, playwright
•Josephine Baker: entertainer
•Willie B. Barrow: minister, civil rights activist
•Daisy Bates: journalist, civil rights activist